HFES Perception and Performance Technical Group Webinar: How HFES Knowledge can Unlock Remote Control Potential – Understanding Motion Sickness and Fostering Situation Awareness

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Includes a Live Web Event on 06/21/2024 at 10:00 AM (EDT)

Presented by: The Perception and Performance Technical Group

In recent years there has been a significant trend across various domains shifting from local to remote control. Remote control can have some relevant advantages, such as increased efficiency, safer working environments for operators, quickly switching between controlled objects, and reducing the logistical impact of autonomous operating systems. However, it significantly changes the operator role and introduces new human-machine interactions. Different ways of information presentations and a lack of auditive and tactile cues changes the way that people acquire situation awareness and can induce symptoms of motion sickness.


Professor Szonya Durant will provide an overview of issues faced by remote operators called on to assist autonomous vehicles. She will discuss how to measure aspects of situation awareness and how interface displays can help improve situation awareness.

Dr. Kay Stanney will provide a review of motion sickness theories and protocols they have developed to minimize adverse effects.

Dr. Alan Hobbs will show how these human factors issues are addressed in the aim to operate Remotely Piloted Aircrafts routinely and safely in civilian airspace. 

Alan Hobbs

Szonya Durant

Kay Stanney

Ellemieke van Doorn (Moderator)

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HFES Perception and Performance Webinar: How HFES Knowledge can Unlock Remote Control Potential – Understanding Motion Sickness and Fostering Situation Awareness
06/21/2024 at 10:00 AM (EDT)  |  60 minutes
06/21/2024 at 10:00 AM (EDT)  |  60 minutes In recent years there has been a significant trend across various domains shifting from local to remote control. Remote control can have some relevant advantages, such as increased efficiency, safer working environments for operators, quickly switching between controlled objects, and reducing the logistical impact of autonomous operating systems. However, it significantly changes the operator role and introduces new human-machine interactions. Different ways of information presentations and a lack of auditive and tactile cues changes the way that people acquire situation awareness and can induce symptoms of motion sickness. Professor Szonya Durant will provide an overview of issues faced by remote operators called on to assist autonomous vehicles. She will discuss how to measure aspects of situation awareness and how interface displays can help improve situation awareness. Dr. Kay Stanney will provide a review of motion sickness theories and protocols they have developed to minimize adverse effects. Dr. Alan Hobbs will show how these human factors issues are addressed in the aim to operate Remotely Piloted Aircrafts routinely and safely in civilian airspace.